Breeder of the Month: Jordan Family Kennels

Each month we're going to feature an interview with a new breeder who we feel supplies high quality cockapoo puppies, are scrupulous and honest, and who have an extensive knowledge and love of cockapoos. Our first Breeder of the Month, for April 2011, is Jordan Family Kennels.

Where are you located and what areas do you sell to? We are in Harrisonville, MO, which is near Kansas City, and we sell to anywhere in the US and Canada.

How long have you been working with cockapoos? 13 years.

What made you want to become a cockapoo breeder? I love the calm nature of the breed, and many of our Cockapoos become therapy dogs because of their wonderful personalities and smaller size. We breed for smaller Cockapoos between 5 - 15 pounds full grown. My son has asthma and I have found this breed is wonderful for him. They are hypoallergenic and are low to no shedding. They really are the perfect breed in my opinion.

Do you work with any other dog breeds? We also breed Teacup & Tiny Toy Poodles and Cocker Spaniels, but my true love is the Cockapoos.

What sort of traits do you breed for? Optimum health and vigor, smaller size, fluffy, rich colored Cockapoo coats that are hypoallergenic and shed free, wonderful puppy-like personalities that last their entire lives, and a dog with a calm submissive tendency that is great with persons of all ages and other pets. They are extremely smart and potty train and command train very easily in my experience. 

What can you tell us about the mother and father used for your cockapoos and why they were selected? As you look at the pictures on our website of our past Cockapoo puppies you will see why our puppies are desired so much. We like a Cockapoo with a shorter snout and square, small build which has curl to his/her coat. Our Poodle stud is a 2 1/2 pound Teacup Poodle that has the shorter nose that you only see in the teacup Poodles. Our moms are all small Cocker Spaniels about 12 pounds and 11" tall which have a square petite frame and a shorter nose. We also make sure both pedigrees have only small dogs, and that they are all healthy health certified stock.

What sort of things do you do with the puppies to promote socialization? We use bio sensor training that was started by the military. It has many steps that you do each day to promote less stress and healthier more active puppies that develop and bond much quicker. Here is a quick review of this amazing therapy:  

1. TACTILE STIMULATION - Hold the puppy in one hand, the handler gently stimulates (tickles) the pup between the toes on any one foot using a Q-tip. It is not necessary to see that the pup is feeling the tickle.

2. HEAD HELD ERECT - Using both hands, the pup is held perpendicular to the ground, (straight up), so that its head is directly above its tail. This is an upwards position. 
Time of stimulation 3 - 5 seconds. 

3. HEAD POINTED DOWN - Hold the puppy firmly with both hands the head is reversed and is pointed downward so that it is pointing towards the ground. 
Time of stimulation 3 - 5 seconds.

 4. SUPINE POSITION - Hold the puppy so that its back is resting in the palm of both hands with its muzzle facing the ceiling. The pup while on its back is allowed to sleep struggle. Time of stimulation 3-5 seconds.

5. THERMAL STIMULATION - Use a damp towel that has been cooled in a refrigerator for at least five minutes. Place the pup on the towel, feet down. Do not restrain it from moving. Time of stimulation 3-5 seconds.

I strictly follow the Bio Sensor program with the following exceptions. The program is started on the fourth day. On the 3rd day our puppies travel to the veterinarian to have tails docked and dew claws removed. The trip to the vet is more than enough neurological stimulation. I also use the cool metal top of my clothes dryer as the source of my thermal stimulation. In our home our puppies also get sensory therapy as having them walk and play on many different surfaces and eating out of different kinds of bowls, also having several different toys to play with. We keep up with socializing our puppies in every way until the day they leave our home. Our puppies go for trips into town and visit our local nursing home where hands on doggy therapy is much appreciated. We also take them to our children's and other nearby schools where we give short presentations on proper care and training for the perfect family pet, and safety courses on stranger dogs dos and don'ts.  

Do you monitor a puppies temperaments and personalities before you sell them? I am proud to say we have never had any puppies that show aggressive or anxious tendancies and I believe a good reason for that is our socializing and bio sensory training. If we did have a puppy that showed these tendancies we would find an apropriate home that would suit his needs and that of the new owners.

What inoculations and procedures are given before the puppy is sold? All our puppies get their tails & dew claws docked at 3 days old. They get puppy shots at 6 weeks, 9 weeks, and 12 weeks. All puppies are wormed regularly.

What are the usual adult sizes of your cockapoos? Between 5 to 15 pounds and around 10" tall full grown.

What is an average price for one of your puppies? $700-$1000.

What dog breeding clubs and/or organizations do you belong to? ACHC, ACC, and for our full blooded breeds we send puppies with AKC papers. All parents are AKC registered.

Do you have a website with references from people who have bought your puppies? Yes you can visit our site at www.jordanfamilykennels.com.

2 comments:

williamhollo@gmail.com said...

this article certainly makes me want to have a puppy from the Jordan Family Kennels. sarah

Anonymous said...

Don't buy a dog from these people. They have a very messy home exterior with caged dogs that look sick. They refuse to let people in their house so you can't see how they take care of the puppies. The puppy I got from them has major issues. She must have been kept in a cage most of the time where she was made to poop and pee because she has no issues going to the bathroom in her crate and then laying in it, even while in there a short time.