Cockapoo Health: Three Ailments To Watch For

Cockapoos tend to be a fairly healthy breed of dog. They are not particularly susceptible to any health issues, provided they have been bred by careful breeders. Breeders do well to consider the health of the breeding dogs, ensuring that the offspring is more likely to be healthy and free from or less vulnerable to disease.

A dog which may have enjoyed a healthy life is not guaranteed to be invulnerable to disease. A sensible Cockapoo owner should take care to be aware of any signs of illness in their dog. There are some common health issues which your Cockapoo may develop, and which you should be able to identify.

Gastric Torsion

Your Cockapoo may suffer from gastric torsion when his stomach is over-inflated with gas or with fluid. Identifying this condition and taking immediate action are essential. If left untreated, this problem is potentially fatal. Watch your dog for signs of difficulty breathing, for excessive salivation, or retching without actually vomiting. Your Cockapoo may be overly restless and may also suffer from an uncomfortably distended abdomen. If this is the case then your Cockapoo will probably whine if you apply pressure to his stomach area. If you have identified the symptoms of torsion, it is important that you take your Cockapoo to your vet immediately. Corrective surgery may be carried out to rectify the condition. In the long term, it is good practice to monitor your dog’s feeding by giving him smaller meals more frequently, instead of one large meal. It may be necessary to restrict his water intake, especially after a meal, so that bloating does not occur.

Luxating Patella

Luxating patella occurs when your dog’s kneecap has been dislocated or moved from its normal position. This condition may be as a result of a birth defect, or may occur following an accident when your dog has suffered trauma. If the condition is not treated, your dog’s mobility will suffer, as will his overall health and wellbeing. Luxating patella can be identified by a stiff gait as well as your dog needing to stop frequently and possibly showing signs of anguish when running. This problem is usually best treated by means of corrective surgery.

If you'd like to know more, luxating patella has been discussed in detail in an earlier post, HERE.

Hypothyroidism

If your Cockapoo’s metabolism is not functioning as it should, it may be that he is suffering from hypothyroidism, whereby his body does not produce enough of the hormone thyroid. There are a number of symptoms of hypothyroidism. These include weight gain, even if your dog has a moderate diet, chronic skin problems which may recur after treatment, lethargy and excessive loss of hair. Unfortunately, hypothyroidism is not curable, but the condition may be treated. Typically, treatment involves administering a hormone called thyroxine, which is a synthetic thyroid hormone.

Identifying signs of illness speedily and arranging treatment as soon as possible is important to ensure the ongoing health of your Cockapoo. Acting quickly will mean that your Cockapoo does not suffer unnecessarily, and will increase the chances of success in treating curable conditions.

7 comments:

Nancy Stewart said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Nancy Stewart said...

My Miss Maddie has had surgery on both knees. The first time was from catching a frisbee thrown 12 inches from the ground. The second was several years later after jumping off the bed. We have pet steps everywhere in the house to prevent her from jumping, but my granddaughter threw a toy from the bed and she just jumped. She is 13 years old now and still gets around like a puppy

Anonymous said...

My cockapoo Bella is only 17 months and has always jumped to catch balls etc. However, after a period of 6 weeks of on and off limping, she is booked in for surgery on her left leg on Monday. I am a bit anxious about the surgery but the vet said it is necessary to repair the luxating patella.

the Editor said...

Hi Nancy! Glad the surgeries have helped your little lady. The steps you have taken are good, responsible ones. Anonymous, I'm sorry to hear that Bella needs knee surgery so young. Chances are very good she'll be fine, and she is young enough to make a speedy full recovery. Make sure to be very careful from now on, as she may be predisposed to these troubles genetically. Perhaps try some joint supplements for dogs, devise lower impact ways for her to exercise with your vet's approval, and keep an eye on her habits. There is another article on this site about luxating patellas that is worth reading, as well.

Anonymous said...

my cockapoo poppy is just over one and she has been diagnosed with hip dysplasia. It is severe on left side and mild on right. She is currently getting hydrotherapy and surgery is not recommended but she doesn't understand why she isn't getting her long off lead walks, she can only get slow 5 minute walks 2 or 3 times a day. Should i have asked if the parents had been hip scored and if so what breed the poodle or the dad.

Rebecca said...

Any insight on this disorder: Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia? We are dealing with it now and understand it is common to cockers and poodles...

the Editor said...

Hi, Rebecca. We have no experience with this disorder, but we're looking into having an article written about it by someone who does.